ClevelanDish

A Guide to Dining, Eating and Cooking in Cleveland, Ohio

Recipe Report: Julia Child’s Boeuf Bourguignon February 16, 2011

Filed under: Celebrity Chefs,Dinner,Food Ideas,Recipes and Preparations — jenniferferf @ 10:15 pm

Winter in Cleveland is cold.  Cold enough for desperate measures.

And on a very chilly winter Saturday recently I was driven to cook – specifically Julia Child’s Boeuf Bourguignon.  Simple, really.

Step 1:  Saute onions and carrots in butter (more butter than you would think is necessary, really).

Step 2:  Pat meat (top sirloin) dry with paper towels and saute with the veggies until the meat is browned.

Step 3:  Cover the beef and vegetables with beef stock and wine, add a little thyme and a bay leaf, and simmer it until it falls apart – at least two hours or so.

Serve over rice, or gnocchi, or boiled potatoes.  Just as Julia intended!

Knopf has kindly made a PDF of Julia’s recipe available on its website.

 

Recipe Report: Ginger Fried Rice

Filed under: Celebrity Chefs,Dinner,Food Ideas,Fresh,Recipes and Preparations — jenniferferf @ 10:02 pm

i.e. my dinnerThe other day I felt inspired to try another recipe from Mark Bittman – Ginger Fried Rice.  Mark Bittman adapted the recipe from Jean Georges, and I found that it nicely balanced the savory, sweet elements of the dish.

The recipe was fairly simple, although it took me far longer than the  30 minutes it claimed to take – more like 1 hour and 30 minutes by the time I chopped the leeks and minced the garlic and ginger.  I recommend finding a sous chef or some sort of knife wizard to help you with the prep work.

I agree with Bittman that the killer ingredient is the fried minced garlic and ginger and I intend to use that in other dishes as well!  The other killer ingredient was the runny yolk in the sunny-side-up egg that mixed in with all the ingredients.  YUM!

See Mark Bittman’s video at nytimes.com.

Ginger Fried Rice Recipe (from http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/27/dining/271mrex.html?_r=1)

Time: About 30 minutes

1/2 cup peanut oil
2 tbsp minced garlic
2 tbsp minced ginger
Salt
2 cups thinly sliced leeks, white and light green parts only, rinsed and dried
4 cups day-old cooked rice, preferably jasmine, at room temp
4 large eggs
2 tsp sesame oil
4 tsp soy sauce

1.  In a large skillet, heat 1/4 cup oil over medium heat.  Add garlic and ginger and cook, stirring occasionally, until crisp and brown.  With a slotted spoon, transfer to paper towels and salt lightly.

2.  Reduce heat under skillet to medium-low and add 2 tbsp oil and leeks.  Cook about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally, until very tender but not browned.  Season lightly with salt.

3.  Raise heat to medium and add rice.  Cook, stirring well, until heated through.  Season to taste with salt.

4.  In a nonstick skillet, fry eggs in remaining roil, sunny-side-up, until edges are set but yolk is still runny.

5.  Divide rice among four dishes.  Top each with an egg and drizzle with 1/2 tsp sesame oil and 1 tsp soy sauce.  Sprinkle crisped garlic and ginger over everything and serve.

Yield: 4 servings.

 

Best Pasta in Cleveland: Ohio City Pasta June 15, 2008

Once you have fresh pasta, there’s no going back.

During an excursion to the West Side Market the other day, I picked up some fresh pasta at the Ohio City Pasta stand, where they make and sell their own pasta. Their display counter showcases a colorful selection of ravoli, gnocchi, sauces, antipasti and more. The herb fettuccine looked particularly colorful and fresh, so I picked up a few servings of that and the saffron linguini. Turns out, good move.

I threw together some simple tomato sauce, with olive oil, garlic, tomatoes and basil and cooked the pasta, no problem. Great idea for making fresh pasta with fresh herbs inside.

Ohio City Pasta doesn’t deprive East siders of excellent fresh pasta – I’ve seen Ohio City Pasta selling pasta at the farmer’s market at Shaker Square! Highly recommended!

 

Recipe: Peanut Butter Bedlam Ice Cream May 4, 2008

A few weeks ago, I got it into my head to figure out how to make good peanut butter ice cream. My first attempt was a disaster. Yesterday I tried a different recipe and the result was declared, by three independent, unbiased taste testers, “the best peanut butter ice cream ever.”

The secret? This book: The Perfect Scoop, by David Lebovtiz. This guy rocks. The Perfect Scoop is my favorite type of cookbook: amazing, creative recipes; solid, even scientific explanations of the ingredients and equipment; and just the right amount of mouth-watering close-ups of the finished product.

Peanut Butter Bedlam Ice Cream
Makes 1 quart.

3/4 cup smooth peanut butter
3/4 cup plus 2 tbsp sugar
2 2/3 cups half and half
pinch of salt
1/8 tsp vanilla

Puree everything in a food processor until smooth. (I just used a whisk for a few minutes.) Chill in the refrigerator, then freeze in your ice cream maker

You can add chopped peanuts at the end to make crunchy, or, I suppose, some make some nice milk chocolate chunks.

I pretty much followed David’s recipe, except that I used Trader Joe’s organic smooth peanut butter instead of regular smooth peanut butter.

If you’re into making ice cream, I highly recommend checking out The Perfect Scoop. Tons of great other flavors, including Guinness-Milk Chocolate Ice Cream, Fresh Ginger Ice Cream, Gianduja Gelato, Goat Cheese Ice Cream, Black Pepper Ice Cream, and a gazillion other extras. Enjoy!

 

South Indian Eggplant Curry April 2, 2008

Filed under: Cuisines,Dinner,Food Ideas,Indian Food,Recipes and Preparations — jenniferferf @ 9:22 pm
Tags: ,

Today’s NY Times food section featured a recipe for South Indian Eggplant Curry that looks fabulous. Can’t wait to try it. I love food section day!

 

Adventures in Indian Cooking… April 1, 2008

With most of the leftover ingredients from my recent successful foray into Indian cooking calling to me from my pantry, I was again enticed to make something Indian to satisfy my cravings for something spicy.

However, due to a distinct lack of paneer readily available, I decided to improvised and see where I could get with some tofu I bought the other day. I probably broke some big rule about indian cooking, but I made Mattar Paneer with tofu instead of paneer. That’s right: Mattar Tofu.

Mattar Paneer is essentially yummy cheese morsels and peas in an aromatic, flavorful tomato sauce and is generally served over basmati rice. By breaking a few rules, I think I have successfully made a shorter, healthier way of making this yummy dish, by using the tofu instead of the paneer and serving it over whole wheat couscous instead of rice.

Permit me to say a few words about couscous. First of all, it’s ridiculously fast and simple. Boil 2 cups of water, turn off the heat, add the couscous and stir, let it sit for a few minutes, and it’s done! And, perhaps more importantly, Hodgson Mill whole wheat couscous I found has added flax seeds, and 6 grams of fiber per 1/3 cups of dry couscous, which I figure is about a serving cooked. Hello! Much healthier than plain white rice. A reasonable substitution in my book.

Here’s the recipe:

Mattar Tofu

Ingredients:
2 12-oz cans Del Monte diced tomatoes, pureed
8 oz. extra firm tofu, cut into bite-sized cubes
canola oil
1 teaspoon cumin seeds
2 bay leaves
dash of cinnamon

1 tablespoon coriander powder
1/2 teaspoon turmeric
1/2 teaspoon chili powder
1/2 teaspoon paprika

8 oz. frozen green peas

1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon sugar
1 tablespoon cornstarch

1. First thing’s first: cut up your tofu and and puree your tomatoes so they’re ready to go in, because timing is key.

2. Get a few tablespoons of canola oil nice and hot in a very large saucepan or a medium soup pot. Add the cumin seeds, bay leaves and cinnamon and stir for a few seconds to release the aromas.

3. Add the tomatoes, coriander powder, turmeric, chili powder and paprika, and simmer all that together for about five minutes or so, until the sauce has reduced some.

4. Then add the peas and cook them until done, about five minutes more.

5. Add the tofu, salt, sugar, and use the cornstarch dissolved in water to thicken if necessary.

I also added tomato paste because I wanted more tomato. Serve over basmati rice or couscous.

Does anyone else have cravings for Indian food like me? Should I start up Indian Food Lovers Anonymous? Yum.

 

Bombay Superstar: Indian Eats From Lakewood March 26, 2008

I love Indian food. I love going to Indian restaurants in Cleveland as much as possible. I get take-out from Cafe Tandoor in Cleveland Heights several times a month – the Paneer Makhani is my favorite – and my new favorite Indian restaurant is Udipi Cafe, at 6339 Olde York Road in Parma. Woah. Talk about amazing, inexpensive Indian food that’s more than worth the drive out there.

For a long time I have wanted to learn to make Indian food myself, and a Saturday road trip to Lakewood brought a serendipitous visit to a well-stocked Indian grocery store, called Indian Food Emporium, at 17796 Detroit Road in Lakewood. My friend and I giddily perused the many shelves of exotic spices, flours, rices and snacks and struck up a conversation with the very friendly and helpful Indian lady at the cash register whose name was Mona Lisa. According to the website, Indian Food Emporium is connected with India Garden in Lakewood, but it’s further down the street.

So, with my cupboard fully stocked with Indian spices, I was determined to make Mattar Paneer, that lovely mix of heavenly mild cheese and peas in an aromatic tomato sauce.

After perusing several Indian cooking websites, I found several websites that were enormously helpful, including Show Me The Curry, Quick Indian Cooking and (my favorite) Manjula’s Kitchen.

Both Show Me The Curry and Manjula’s Kitchen offered exactly what I needed: cheerful Indian women demonstrating their amazing feats of cookery and cheerfully sharing their knowledge in easy to understand, homemade videos. Armed with the ingredients and the knowledge, I undertook my first courageous forray into homemade Indian cuisine.

They were sold out of paneer at Whole Foods (?!?) but luckily Zagara’s had some middle eastern cheese that sounded similar to paneer, so I decided to give it a whirl.

Manjula’s recipe and methods couldn’t be easier:
Make some Basmati rice.
Slice and fry funky cheese cubes.
Puree tomatoes with ginger and garlic paste.
Saute spices for half a minute, then add pureed tomatoes.
Simmer for a while.
Add some frozen peas and cook those until they’re done.
Then add the cheese cubes in, and voila! Homemade Mattar Paneer!

The whole endeavor took less 45 minutes and the result was fabulous. The feature of this dish is, of course, the paneer cheese. Paneer is made simply from milk, and it is a dense cheese that holds its shape when cooked rather than melting. Yay for us!

Next time I am going to make Poori.